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The Conversation

Feb 04, 2019 jjamison

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Edition: CA
4 February 2019

 
 
 

Why social media makes us feel inadequate

Social media is often a virtual fantasyland. You’ve seen the Instagram posts of people with exotic cars or staying at a luxurious resort. How do those posts make you feel? Today in The Conversation Canada, Eleftherios Soleas and Jen McConnel of Queen’s University say research has found social media users who compare themselves to people living a more glamorous lifestyle can lead to confidence problems and other bad feelings.

We’ve got two stories related to climate change: Robert Lennox and Steven Cooke of Carleton University look at the impact that droughts are having on freshwater fish; Korey Pasch of Queen’s University notes the U.S. Department of Defence has identified climate change as a “threat multiplier” for weather-related disasters – even while Donald Trump has pondered about building his border wall with funds intended for disasters.

And finally…I’ll be in Ottawa today for an important media initiative. Simon Fraser University and Informed Opinions are launching the Gender Gap Tracker, which analyzes the gender breakdown of people quoted in mainstream media. Maite Taboada and Fatemeh Torabi Asr of SFU explain how the Gender Gap Tracker’s software works and why measuring things like this can lead to important social change.

Regards,

Scott White

Editor

Today's Featured Articles

Sometimes faking it on Instagram is just fine. Bruno Gomiero/ Unsplash

Scrolling through fairy-tale fantasies on social media can demolish your confidence, but it’s not all bad

Eleftherios Soleas, Queen's University, Ontario; Jen McConnel, Queen's University, Ontario

Consuming too much social media when users end up comparing their lives to others more glamorous can leave one with bad feelings say researchers. But pretending or fantasizing is not all bad either.

A dry river bed in south Australia. (Shutterstock)

How drought affects freshwater fish

Robert Lennox, Carleton University; Steven J Cooke, Carleton University

Freshwater fish are suffering as drought becomes more common and severe. Whether they survive will depend on how governments manage rivers and lakes, and on taking action against climate change.

U.S. President Donald Trump is seen visiting the California town of Paradise that was devastated by forest fires. Trump has threatened to use funds allocated for disaster relief to pay for his border wall. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Disasters and disagreements: Climate change collides with Trump’s border wall

Korey Pasch, Queen's University, Ontario

Donald Trump has threatened to use funds allocated for disaster relief to fund his border wall. It's time to rethink how we frame disasters to stop politicians from using them for political gain.

The Gender Tracker Tool is used to see how well Canadian media is representing women’s voices. This stock photo depicts an example of journalists interviewing a female source. Shutterstock

Tracking the gender gap in Canadian media

Maite Taboada, Simon Fraser University; Fatemeh Torabi Asr, Simon Fraser University

The Gender Gap Tracker uses computational linguistics techniques to analyze how women are mentioned and quoted in Canadian media.

La Conversation Canada

Une nouvelle étude révèle que des niveaux élevés de temps d’écran à deux et trois ans prédisent de moins bons résultats chez l’enfant à trois et cinq ans, respectivement. Shutterstock

Le temps d’écran compromet le développement chez l’enfant, affirme une nouvelle recherche

Dillon Thomas Browne, University of Waterloo; Nicole Racine, University of Calgary; Sheri Madigan, University of Calgary

Une nouvelle étude révèle que des niveaux élevés de temps d’écran à deux et trois ans prédisent de moins bons résultats chez l’enfant à trois et cinq ans, respectivement.

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